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  • #30330

    Snapper
    Mitglied

    So hab den Text abgetippt, wenn ich Zeit hab kommt noch das entsprechende Interview dazu.

    Simon Anderson über die verschiedenen Elemente des Board Designs:

    SIZE

    The best way to gauge what size board a surfer needs is from board to board. Quizzing the on the good and bad of the current board will lead to an accurate assessment of the exact length, width and thickness needed for a new board. There is no universal textbook on board size – everyone has different needs so it’s great to have a starting point. Even if the starting point is a board that doesn’t work, at least the you can build from this. Noting the paddling level , if the board feels too slow, too fast or too stiff. Whatever feels bad can be evident in the shape of a bad board. It’s just a matter of simply changing all those elements. The size of the bard is also fully dependent on the surfing level of the individual, even more so than their height and weight. It is impossible to gauge this level accuretely [without seeing the surfer in action] to arrive at a definitive length, width and thickness, so the only way is build from the previous board. Sometimes the previous board is so far away from being right that you do have to make an educated guess. This is done by using the intimate knowledge of surfboards accumulated over the years as a board maker, but a bit of luck also helps.

    ROCKER

    From the three follwoing rocker types, all boards will feature either one type alone or a combination of two or even three. For example mini-mals and most fish boards gernerally have a low or flat nose rocker and a medium tail rocker. Rocker combinations can be utilised to help improve performance for surfer with different techniques. Front foot surfers will enjoy a low nose entry with medium to full tail rocker. Back foot surfers will be suited to boards with medium to full nose entry going to flat tail rocker. Tall lanky surfers can sometimes enjoy a board with rocker through the middle and low to medium at the nose and or tail. Rocker s a key area of surfboard design where you can change up the performance of any style of boards to suit the individual surfer and surf conditions. Rocker is pretty simple, the more rocker you have the shorter the board turns and the quicker you run out of speed if you are just going straight. The flatter the rocker the board will go quicker in a straight line but have a longer turning arc. This is the principal. However, from there you have the three areas of rocker – nose entry, the mid section or planing area and tail rocker. Adding different combinations of rocker to these three areas, from flat to full curve, you have a very complex and almost limitless playground of optional rocker configurations.

    FLAT ROCKER BOARDS

    Boards with flat rocker will have a low nose entry, be flat through the middle and have flat tail rocker. This combination will be fast down the line and fast even when just trimming. It will have long turning arc and resist attempts to turn short and go vertical. Flat rocker boards are best in full-face waves like Bells Beach, or any small to medium high tide surf. Flat Rocker also fits nicely whith short fish style or retro type boards,

    MEDIUM ROCKER

    Boards with a medium rocker consist of smooth nose entry and smooth tail rocker. This will be the rocker style you’ll see predominantly on most boards today. Medium rocker suits a wide variety of board types and wave conditions.

    STEEP ROCKER BOARDS

    Boards with steep rocker have full curve nose and tail; they will have litlle speed down the line but will turn in a short arc and go vertical without much effort. However, steep rocker boards can become very quick across the wave because they are efficient rail to rail, enabling you to access the speed part of the wave where you can change direction downwards to gain max speed. Full rocker works best on low volume, deep concave, high performance type boards. It suits clean and hollow surf like Snapper or D’bah or any low tide Conditions.

    RAILS

    The function of the rail is to deliver the board into the water through turns. You combine the thickness of the board and rail type to control the depth the board will penetrate into the water at various speeds, from flat out to low speed, through all turns on the wave face.

    FULL RAILS

    Full rails have increased volume, feel chunky in the hand they tend to have less tuck on the underside of the rail to the bottom. The lower tighter tuck gives the full rail more feel and life. Full rails are usually associated with a flatter deck but can be at the end of a vee deck, creating a low but boxy full rail. In the modern high performance thruster full rail boards will generally be associated with a thinner board or vee decks. Fuller rails were the norm through the ’70s and ’80s, combining well with the traditionally wider single fin and twin fin boards with their wider noses, pulled in tails, flatter rocker and vee bottom. A full rail will help the board sit on top of the water more, provide good trim speed and glide across the wave.

    MEDIUM RAIL

    Medium rail transitions from a slightly rolled or vee deck and can have a low or soft tucked under rail to either heighten or reduce sensitivity. The medium rail is commonly used in most fish and hybrid boards, as well as most modern thinner high performance craft. Works well in all surf conditions and is the most forgiving rail meaning less chance of catching or digging in through turns or overloading at high speeds.

    LOW RAIL

    Rolled or low rail is associated with a rolled deck and has a soft tucked underside to prevent it catching and feeling slightly sticky or over-sensitive. The low rail will penetrate deepest trough turns on the face and is desirable for clean hollow surf and in boards with a lot of rocker and or concave. Low rail is the rail most likely to overload at speed and jump from the water, but paradoxically in my opinion, it is also the rail to offer the best potential for all round performance at the highest level in surfing. The key is to have the right balance of all the design elements – thickness, width and rocker with concave combinations.

    TAILS

    ROUND

    The round tail flows smoothly from the wide point to the tail and is rounded in shape, half way between a rounded square and pin-tail. With less surface area and a lot of curve through the tail, it will be slower but helps the board initiate a turn easier and also turns in a shorter arc. This works nicely on good waves and waves with tight pockets.

    ROUNDED SQUARE

    The most common tail shape for all-round small waves and high performance pro boards. The area under the back foot helps with speed because of the greater planing or surface area, and at speed you can generate your best turns.

    SUQASH TAIL

    The same as rounded square but the squash has more curve in the plan shape to the squared off area at the tail, effectively acting halfway between rounded square and round tail. A squash can be applied to any style board for any wave size but is most used as a small wave all-round option.

    SWALLOW TAIL

    The swallow has a similar plan shape area to a rounded square, but the outline extends to the swallow tip. This gives more rail line at the back to the tip, producing slightly extended rail turns with swallow tip acting as a claw by holding onto the wave face. Good for all-round surf and can be utilised successfully on small wave fishes or step up boards to any length.

    ROUNDED PIN

    Similar to a round tail, the rounded pin comes to more of a point at the end. With less area but a lot of curve, the round pin will initiate turns easily and turn shorter on the wave face and the pocket when needed but will still have hold on the wave face. Popular in longer step up boards.

    PIN

    The pin has constant slight curve to a norrow tip, not leaving much surface area at the back. This allows for maximum hold through turns and the ability to hold a high line while trimming on the face of the wave when outrunning big sections. Mostly favoured for big wave paddle in spots like Sunset, Waimea and Mavericks.

    WIDTH

    WIDER BOARDS

    Width, like any of the design elements, is critical to get right. Wider boards will be faster on the flat because they have more surface area, but this extra width makes the board slower when transitioning rail to rail. So when you need a quick transition like a cutback in a tight pocket, the wide board can end up feeling too slow and you miss the timing you need in that section. Having a shorter board in this case can help rectify this. A shorter board will turn in a shorter arc and respond nicely in a tight pocket. The extra curve nose to tail in the plan shape of a short wide board is also a turn shortening agent and is why fish boards are popular in small surf. The width on a fish board also feels nice because you can use the width to hold length of turn when needed, like off the bottom. The slower rail to rail transition on a wide board can force you to surf smoother through turns improving performance.

    NARROWER BOARDS

    Narrow boards produce straighter lines in the plan shape, which tend to increase length of turn and produce an overall feeling of stiffness. Shapers can address this by increasing the rocker in a narrow board to shorten the turning arc. A narrow board will be fast in solid surf, primarily because with the straighter outline you can hold your line higher on the wave face where the speed is without the board slipping or sliding and washing off speed. Narrow can be good for big hollow waves and was popular during the single fin era at Pipeline.

    THICKNESS

    Thickness works in conjunction with every other design element and is a standard you need to get right in particular when it is combined with the rail type and volume. If your board is too thick it will sit too high in the water and be prone to spinning out through turns and it’ll be also be hard to penetrate the water when initiating a turn. A board too thin will sit low in the water and will be harder to paddle into a wave. It will also penetrate the water too deeply when you go into a turn, loose momentum and slow up quicker after the turn. Thickness distribution from nose to tail will change the feel of the board. Modern high performance boards are thin at the nose and tail, while retro boards are thicker. Making a board thinner through the nose will move the volume balance back, giving the nose a lighter feel enabling you t flick the board around more freely. A thicker nose board will move the volume balance forward; this will keep the nose up through rail turns because it resists penetrating the water. Particularly in bottom turns where it allows the fins to remain deeper in the water, whereas the thinner nose board will turn flatter, keeping the fins shallow and enabling slide potential during the course of a turn. Same for the tail, a thin tail will sit deeper in the turn; a thick tail will tend to sit high through the turn. There is a myriad of combinations you can make with thickness distribution and rail variations to soup up or tone down performance.

    OUTLINE

    Outline is manipulated by working the universal nose and tail width points at 12“ back from the nose tip and 12“ back from the tail. This produces performance variables similar to thickness distribution. If you make the nose narrower at the 12“ point your board will have less surface area and therefore less volume, making the board feel lighter and easier to flick around. Having a narrower nose will produce a straighter curve in the first quarter of the board and increased curve in the next quarter through to the wide point, usually halfway. Making the nose wider at the 12“ point has the opposite effect, increasing plan shape curve towards the nose and then straightening the curve to the mid point of the board. This will increase surface area, increase the length of turns and force the back area of the board to sit loweder in the water through turns. Manipulate the 12“ point at the tail for similar results. Narrower will reduce surface are and keep the fins low in the water, increasing hold and making the board feel stiffer.increase the width and the board will sit up on the water, produce easier spped but loose positive hold. The plan shape curve through the back half of the board combines with tail templates like rounded square or roundtail, so manipulating the width at the 12“ point will not change the curve as much as in the nose area, but will, of course, change tail surface area dramatically. So manipulating the plan shape curve is an important part of defining how your board will perform, whether it’s light and lively, solid and drivey or a blend of the two.

    FIN PLACEMENT

    Fins found ther way to the current set up position because that’s where they work best. It will be interesting to see what the final formula or placement will be with quads. I know that Bruce McKee, the original innovator of the quad, has a formula he swears by and is adamant that everyone should adopt. But it’s just not in the nature of surfers and board makers to accept anyone else’s theories on design. Kelly, along with Stretch and Nathan Fletcher, isobviously setting the pace in the world of quds in both big and small surf right now, and we are pretty clsoe but I don’t believe we have arrived at a definitive placement. There is a fairly universal view of the right position on the board for a thruster set up, but having said that everyone has slight variations on placement. There are severalelements you take into account when formulating the position for your fins and marking them in pencil on the shape. First up, the distance up the board for the back of the side fins, and the back of the rear fin. The round about formula for this on a normal high performance thruster is 11“ up from the back of the board for the side fins and 3 3/8“ up for the back fin. From this point you could then move back fin forward a little to 3 1/2“ which would make the board a little looser, but sacrifice a little hold at the sime time. From here you would now establish how far in from the rail the back of the side fins will be, thus determining how far apart they are. The norm for this is somewhere between 1“ and 1 1/4“ in from the rail. Around 1 1/8“ in is standaard. Now you have the point where you place the dot on the foam for the side thruster fins. Next you need to consider where to point the side fins [the back fin of course points directly along the stringer]. The normal direction for side fins is roughly 1“ to 1 1/2“ straighter than if they were pointing to the tip of the nose. Pointing the fins directly t the nose tip will allow the board to change direction asier but it won’t move through the water as fast. Pointing the fins straighter to say 2“ wider of the nose tip will allow the board to run freer with more speed but lack a little direction. Finally you need to take into account the angle at which the fin will lean over, this is sometimes referred to as the cant angle or tow out angle. The usual angle for a high performance thruster is between 4 and 6 degrees. The depth of a concave then affects this angle. Concave will straighten the fin up (more vertical) so usually a deep concave will have 5 to 6 degree, and shallower concave will have 4 or 5. Vee bottoms need a straighter angle and generlly 3 degrees is around the norm. The general rule is a board with the fins at a straighter angle will go into a turn easier but will be slower through the water. So you can see there is a lot of stuff going on in the fin area of the board. To find out more about fins and fin effect go to the FCS or Futures websites. FCS did do some tank testing a few years back and I’m sure they got some interesting results.

    BOTTOM SHAPES

    FLAT

    Flat bottoms are dead flat from rail to rail throughout the length of the board and is neutral feel bottom hardly ever seen, ut it does tend to compliment full rails.

    VEE

    Vee bottom boards are usually flat in the nose entry area whith the vee starting just before halfway and peaking (highest point) at or in front of the fin area before fading out at the tail. The vee can be rolled but is generally a flat panel either side of the stringer varying in depth from 1/16“ to 3/8“ in wider tail boards. Vee bottoms work well in any big board including mals, mini mals, step up semi guns and guns. The vee bottom aids smooth rail to rail transition and is the most stable bottom for navigating across the fave of big paddle waves. Vee bottoms dominated board design from the short board revoultion in the late ’60s to the early ’90s complimenting the flat rockered, wider and thicker boards of that era. Maurice Cole introduced the EEV bottom, which was forward vee peaking at about half way before going to a flat bottom through the fin area to the rail. This gave the vee bottom some added life and was popular from the late ’80s to early ’90s before concave took over as most popular bottom shape.

    CONCAVE

    Concave starts just back from the nose and continues through the entire length of the board. Concaves can be 1/16“ to 3/16“ deep and are usually deepest in front of the side fins of a thruster board before fading out at the tail. The concave bottom creates a straighter rocker line through the board along the stringer, and in combination with gutter effect caused by the curved contour shape, funnels the water super efficiently creating a hydroplane or lifting effect to generate speed. Shallow concave will have less lifting effect and therefore be slower but more stable, deeper concave will of course have more lift and greater speed but will not be as stable. Although, having deep concave can help hold you in higher on the wave face cutting into the water more efficiently and deeply. There are two types of concave – single and double. Shapers can also use any combination of the two types of concave. The most commonly used concaves are the single concave bottom, and the single concave to double concave (through the back half). From here shapers can manipulate the depth of the concave at any point along the bottom to change up the feel of the board or make it fit a certain type of surf. Single concave is the fastest and is generally ridden by pro surfers in association with light weight boards. Single concave works best in small or clean waves and will be more dynamic off the top, giving added extension through turns due to the extra speed. Single to double concave is not quite as fast but has more control due to the double. The double concave peaks at the stringer and acts as a vee inside the concave, which has the effect of stabilising the board at speed and enabling you to initiate turns smoothly. The peak of the double feels a little like the tail of an airplane allowing you to break the track of the hydroplaning concave more readily, making single to double concave boards more desirable in choppy or strong surf.

    CHANNELS

    Channels are relevant to a degree, but board makers need to be committed to the manufacturing process. It is difficult to glass and sand a channel bottom board without creating a weak spot on one of the channels points. It is not uncommon to see a high number of deep channel bottom boards with cracks or creases in and around the fins. It is much easier to manufacture a concave bottom board so I have to ask if channels work no better then why bother. There are people, surfers and shapers, who will argue channels work better but I’m not one. Channels perform a similar function to the concave efficiently funnelling the water across the bottom, but in this case the channel area is usually from the mid point of the board to the tail. In the 6 deep channel variety the two outside channels will cut through the rail at the tail and the middle channel fades out at the tail block. The channels are usually 1/8“ to 1/2“ deep, and are cut into foam with flat panels in the valley and perpendicular walls to the channel tip. The width of each channel will be formulated by an equation that takes into account the positioning of the side fins. The feel on the wave is one of speed and good hold on the wave face through turns. The channels each act as an extended edge for hold and to add speed. Channel bottom boards are still popular in Queensland and go best in clean point style waves. I have had many good to magic channel bottom boards, including the less popular 4 belly style shallower channels but I reckon this design had it’s day.
    As shapers we have many elements to play around with it’s almost limitless. The fact that we have no tank testing, because of the differing shape of waves, the different energies, directions and refractions, the myriad of different reef and sand bottoms surfed by surfers of all physical shapes, sizes and abilities it is not possible to put a limit on it with any authority anyway, so we are free agents to do what we like and claim it. This is the beauty of surfing and board making; any opinions expressed here are just that and are debatable as accurate statements. By going over the info contained here you will hopefully gain a basic concept of some of the factors that affect the your board surfs. I think it is always nice to know why board is not working. I don’t know that you can ever know exactly what is making your board work, but when it goes wrong to be able to break it down and having an idea of why is invaluable. There is no substitute for working with a shaper but there are also many good-looking craft lining the rack of surf shops. Purchasing online is no advisable, it is always best to see the board and use the knowledge you have, get the feel of the board in your hands and check weight, dimensions, plan shape, rail volume, rocker, concave and how the fins sit. This will always be the best way to a good board. Having a dialogue on boards with someone you trust is also handy, it’s like knowing a good mechanic.

    Sehr geile Infos wie ich finde, auch wenns für einige erstmal viel Input sein wird:)

    #130268

    scientist
    Surfer

    Mich würde das sehr interessieren. So eine Beschreibung suche ich schon länger.
    Falls du mal Zeit findest, ein paar Fotos von den Seiten zu machen, würde mich das freuen!

    #130269

    fufanu
    Surfer

    Ja, Interesse. Danke!

    #130270

    MEWD
    Surfer

    Ja, Interesse. Danke!

    +1

    #130279

    Schließ mich auch an, wär echt cool 😉
    Ich sag schonmal Danke!

    #130289

    Mekuri
    Mitglied

    würd mich auch interessieren

    #130294

    Snapper
    Mitglied

    Jo ich hoffe ich find heute die Zeit, die Seiten in vernünftiger Qualität hochzuladen;)

    #130295

    T.R.
    Mitglied

    … dann würd ich die Seiten abfotografieren und hochladen, hab hier leider keinen Scanner und Abtippen würd ewig dauern.

    ich denk mal das kannst du dir sparen.
    wird wahrscheinlich eh geloescht.

    #130296

    dr-surf
    Moderator

    … dann würd ich die Seiten abfotografieren und hochladen, hab hier leider keinen Scanner und Abtippen würd ewig dauern.

    ich denk mal das kannst du dir sparen.
    wird wahrscheinlich eh geloescht.

    Och, das klingt so böse. Hast du Bock auf ne Abmahnung vom Anwalt wg. Copyrightverletzung? Wir nämlich auch nicht.
    Ich kann mir aber nicht vorstellen, dass ein australisches Surfmagazin in Deutschland auf die Suche nach einem einzelnen gescannten Artikel geht – zumal das Magazin hier eh nicht erhältlich ist und die Leute es somit gar nicht kaufen könnten selbst wenn sie wollten. Wenn daher hier ein paar Scans davon landen kann ich ja einfach so tun als hätte ichs nicht gesehen.

    #130301

    T.R.
    Mitglied

    hehe, das war ueberhaupt nicht boese gemeint … eher voller ernst. aber wenn du gescannte artikel hier drin stehen haben willst, mir solls recht sein. no risk, no fun 😆

    #130349

    holiday
    Surfer

    hätte auch interesse. wäre mal endlich wieder was richtig lesenswertes – zumindest so wie es klingt.

    kannst du doch temporär hier reinlinken und fertig ist.

    #130354

    Snapper
    Mitglied

    Habs mal abfotogrphiert, aber die Ränder sind scheisse, der Text geht bis zur Falz und kommt net ganz drauf. Hab die nächsten Tage nen bisschen mehr Zeit, und werd den Text mal übersetzen und zusammenfassen und dann hier posten.

    #130359

    dr-surf
    Moderator

    Du willst nicht ernsthaft den ganzen Artikel auf deutsch abtippen, blos weil hier vielleicht einige zu bequem sind Englisch zu lesen? 😉

    #130366

    holiday
    Surfer

    würde auch stark eine englische original-version bevorzugen. falls nur deutsch, dann lass aber bitte die fachtermini in englisch – nicht das nachher aus dem tail ein schwanz wird etc.

    #130374

    elchsfell
    Surfer

    …nicht das nachher aus dem tail ein schwanz wird…

    Hehehe…

    #130432

    Snapper
    Mitglied

    das mit dem bekloppten eindeutschen von Fachtermini sehe ich mal als persönliche beleidigung an;)
    Text ist zum Großteil fertig interview kommt noch, hab den ersten Beitrag dementsprechend editiert

    #130436

    dr-surf
    Moderator

    Vielen Dank für die Mühe die du dir gemacht hast. Hab den Text auf der Kofferraumklappe meines Jeeps sitzend auf meinem ipad am Strand von Malibu gelesen. Dachte das paßt… :whistle:

    #130442

    Snapper
    Mitglied

    Nen ipad waer mal was zum reisen;) Den Rest tipp ich im Flieger, dank der bescheuerten Logik von Emirates darf ich um von Melbourne nach Bali zu kommen 32h unterwegs sein: Melbourne, Auckland, Brisbane, Singapur, Denpasar. Soo ein Schwachsinn, aber ansonsten verfaellt mein Ticket.
    Forecast sieht zum Glueck nett aus 6ft @16sec 🙂 Werd wohl mein Quiver aufstocken muessen mit nem Step up. 1 Monat Indo bevors nach Hause geht, das wird genial:)

    #130444

    roots1976
    Surfer

    Forecast sieht zum Glueck nett aus 6ft @16sec 🙂 Werd wohl mein Quiver aufstocken muessen mit nem Step up. 1 Monat Indo bevors nach Hause geht, das wird genial:)

    Das solltest du definitiv, wenn du zum surfing und nicht für’s Plantschen nach Bali fliegst. Ohne step up bzw. minigun von 6’6″ aufwärts im quiver fliege ich gar nicht erst nach Indo. Gibt doch fast nix dämlicheres, als nach Tausenden Flugmeilen im Tropenparadies anzukommen und mit zu kurzem board/falschem shape am Strand oder auf’m boat zu hocken, während sich da draußen ein amtlicher swell aufbaut. Zum Glück habe ich mittlerweile einen ganzen Haufen an boards, strategisch über Teile Indos verteilt, eingelagert, so daß ich eigentlich nur noch mit boardshorts und Personalausweis einreisen bräuchte.

    Wünsche dir jedenfalls viel Spaß! Komme auch bald…

    Gruß

    #130445

    Snapper
    Mitglied

    Ja werd mir auf jeden Fall ne gebrauchte Minigun in 6’6″ holen. War 8,5 Monate in Oz unterwegs und hab zur Zeit nen Smallwave 5’10 x 19 1/2 x 2 3/8 was mir in Indo herzlich wenig bringt, nen 6’0 x 18 5/8 x 2 1/4 war damit in 6ft an den Points anner Gold Coast und das war super und für alles Größere muss ich mir dann was zulegen, hab zwar noch nen 6’4 x 18 3/4 x 2 3/8 dabei aber das stirbt bald und fühlt sich scheisse an. Das wird denk ich auf Bali bleiben oder an iwen verschenkt, ders brauchen kann. Wie sind die gebrauchtpreise für Boards in Bali? Von den bekannten Shapern wahrscheinlich wie in Oz und von local Shapern entsprechend günstiger?

    #130448

    roots1976
    Surfer

    Neue surfboards namhafter, bekannter shaper und brands kosten annähernd soviel wie in Deutschland. Man kann hier und da aber immer noch ein paar extras a la leash, fins, pad, o.ä. aushandeln. Local brands sind in der Regel günstiger, aber unterscheiden sich massiv in der Qualität. Von Schrott bis erste Sahne kannste da alles finden. Gebrauchte boards namhafter shaper und brands kann man zu recht moderaten Preisen erwerben, zumindest was ich gesehen habe. Selber habe ich mir noch nie ein gebrauchtes board gekauft. Ist irgendwie wie mit gebrauchten Schuhen oder boxershorts. Bei gebrauchten boards in irgendwelchen shops in den Poppies oder so würde ich auch tierisch aufpassen, daß man da nicht ‘nen board angedreht kriegt, welches auf’n ersten Blick top aussieht, sich aber dann doch als schonmal gebrochen und anschließend mit balinesischer Kunstfertigkeit meisterlich zusammengeflickt und lackiert herausstellt.

    Gruß

    #130458

    scientist
    Surfer

    Danke für die Mühe!
    Das ist ja wirklich geballte Information 🙂

    #130468

    dr-surf
    Moderator

    Nen ipad waer mal was zum reisen;) Den Rest tipp ich im Flieger, dank der bescheuerten Logik von Emirates darf ich um von Melbourne nach Bali zu kommen 32h unterwegs sein: Melbourne, Auckland, Brisbane, Singapur, Denpasar. Soo ein Schwachsinn, aber ansonsten verfaellt mein Ticket.

    Bei 10x ein-und ausladen in den Flieger wird vermutlich nicht nur dein eines Shortboard nicht mehr ganz frisch aussehen – Vile Glück!

    Könntest du mit Roots bitte ansonsten nen neuen Thread aufmachen wenns weiter um Bali gehen soll?

    Gruß
    Jan

    #30331

    Logan
    Surfer

    Vielen Dank für den Artikel! Waren auf jeden Fall einige neue infos dabei die ich noch nicht kannte.

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